Hall of Fame - Inductee Detail

Dick "Kaz" Kazmaier

Dick "Kaz" Kazmaier

Details

  • Position: Halfback
  • School: Princeton
  • High School: Maumee, OH (Maumee HS)
  • Years: 1949-1951
  • Inducted: 1966
  • Place of Birth: Toledo, OH
  • Date of Birth: Nov 23, 1930
  • Date of Death: Aug 01, 2013
  • Jersey Number: 42
  • Height: 5-11
  • Weight: 171

Member Biography

Dick Kazmaier was the starting left halfback for Princeton's single-wing attack. In 1949 against Pennsylvania, he rushed 15 times for 135 yards and completed 12 of 14 passes. In 1951, he scored on runs of 13 and 61 yards in a 12-0 victory over Brown and had 360 yards total offense against Cornell. In that game, he rushed 18 times for 124 yards, completed 15 of 17 passes for 236 yards. He was All-America in 1950 and 1951. In 1951 he led the nation in total offense, 1827 yards, touchdowns responsible for, 22, and passing percentage, .626. That year he won the Heisman and Maxwell Trophies. United Press named him Player of the Year. Associated Press voted him Male Athlete of the Year. Time Magazine ran his picture on its cover (November 19). In three years he also punted 102 times for a 36-yard average. He graduated cum laude in 1952 and received the John Poe Award for student achievement. Kazmaier turned down pro football offers, obtained a master's in business administration at Harvard, and was in the U.S. Navy three years 1955-57, attaining the rank of lieutenant. He went into business, was president of five companies, and founded Kazmaier Associates. Kazmaier was a native of Maumee, Ohio, and attended Princeton on an academic scholarship. He served as a director of the Red Cross, director of the Ladies Professional Golfers Association, trustee of Princeton University, director of the Knight Foundation on Intercollegiate Athletics, and chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness. He served as National Football Foundation director and its president 1974- 86. The NCAA gave him its Silver Anniversary Award, the National Football Foundation its Distinguished American Award.