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This Week in College Football History: Jan. 5-11
This Week in College Football History takes a look back at some of college football's landmark moments over the last 146 years.
Published: 1/2/2015 3:30:00 PM
(Pictured: In the 2009 BCS National Championship, Florida bested Oklahoma in a clash of Heisman Trophy winners with the Gators’ Tim Tebow (2007), who also took home the 2009 William V. Campbell Trophy, going up against the Sooners’ Sam Bradford (2008).

As part of an ongoing series throughout the fall, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame posts This Week in College Football History, which takes a look back at some of college football's landmark moments over the last 146 years. If you choose to use this content in whole or in part, as a courtesy, please credit The National Football Foundation and use the NFF logo, which can be downloaded by clicking here.

FEATURED MOMENT
 

Jan. 8, 2009
No. 2 Florida def. No. 1 Oklahoma, 24-14
BCS National Championship – Miami Gardens, Fla.

Florida bested Oklahoma in a clash of Heisman Trophy winners with the Gators’ Tim Tebow (2007), who also took home the 2009 William V. Campbell Trophy, going up against the Sooners’ Sam Bradford (2008). Tebow and Bradford traded touchdowns early in the second quarter for a 7-7 score at halftime. Percy Harvin, on his way to a 122-yard rushing day, plunged in for a touchdown, giving the Gators a 14-7 lead going into the fourth quarter. Bradford found Jermaine Gresham in the end zone for the second time that night to even the score. A Gator field goal and another Tebow passing touchdown put the game out of the Sooners’ reach. Florida clinched their second national title in three seasons, finishing atop the final AP Poll with a 13-1 record. Oklahoma fell to No. 5 with a record of 12-2.


OTHER NOTABLE MOMENTS

Jan. 5, 2010
No. 10 Iowa def. No. 9 Georgia Tech, 24-14
Orange Bowl - Miami Gardens, Fla.

In the coldest Orange Bowl ever, Iowa defeated ACC Champion Georgia Tech to win its first major bowl game since 1959. The Hawkeyes’ defense led the way, holding the normally potent Yellow Jackets offense to 143 rushing yards, well below its average of 307.2 per game, which resulted in season lows in both points (14) and total yards (156). Defensive end Adrian Clayborn led Iowa's defensive charge, recording two sacks and nine tackles en route to being named the game's MVP. On offense, Hawkeyes quarterback Ricky Stanzi completed 17-of-29 passes for 231 yards and threw two touchdowns in the first quarter. Despite its struggles, Georgia Tech managed to keep the game close as safety Jerrard Tarrant answered Stanzi’s touchdowns with a 40-yard interception return for a touchdown near the end of the first quarter. After a field goal gave Iowa a 17-7 lead in the third quarter, Georgia Tech managed its first scoring drive, culminating with Anthony Allen's one-yard touchdown run to cut the lead to 17-14 with 12:30 left. However, running back Brandon Wegher responded with a 32-yard touchdown run with 1:56 left in the game, sealing Iowa’s first BCS bowl win. The Hawkeyes finished the season 11-2 to match the school record for victories, and they finished at No. 7 in the final AP poll, their highest final ranking since finishing No. 3 in 1960. Georgia Tech would finish the year at No. 13 with an 11-3 record.

Jan. 6, 2007
Cincinnati def. Western Michigan, 27-24
International Bowl – Toronto, Ontario, Canada

The inaugural International Bowl was the first Division I football game held outside the U.S. since 1996 and the first postseason bowl game played outside the U.S. since 1937. Newly-hired Cincinnati head coach Brian Kelly also became the first head coach to beat the same team twice in the same season as the head coach at two different schools, having coached MAC-rival Central Michigan during the regular season. The Bearcats built a 24-0 first-quarter lead with the help of a pick-six on Western Michigan’s first series, two passing touchdowns by Nick Davila and a field goal. The Broncos dominated the second quarter, as signal-caller E.J. Biggers scored twice through the air. Western Michigan also tacked on a field goal just before halftime. Turnovers marred both teams in the second half, but Western Michigan leveled the score in the fourth quarter on a Brandon West touchdown run. On the ensuing possession, Bearcats kicker Kevin Lovell finished off an 81-yard drive with a game-winning 33-yard field goal. Both squads finished with 8-5 records.

Jan. 7, 1950
South def. North, 22-13
Senior Bowl – Jacksonville, Fla.

When Nashville businessman Jimmie Pearre staged the first Senior Bowl at the Gator Bowl in 1950, he started a tradition as one of the premier postseason college football games. The South took home the victory in the inaugural Senior Bowl, which featured College Football Hall of Famers Charlie Justice (North Carolina), Eddie LeBaron (Pacific), Eddie Price (Tulane) and Doak Walker (SMU). However, Auburn’s Travis Tidwell claimed the spotlight as the star of the game, throwing for two touchdowns and running for a third on his way to the game’s MVP award.

Jan. 9, 2011
No. 15 Nevada def. Boston College, 20-13
Fight Hunger Bowl – San Francisco

College Football Hall of Fame head coach Chris Ault led Nevada to their best finish since moving up to the FBS in 1992, and he captured what would turn out to be his final bowl victory of his 28-year tenure in Reno. The Wolf Pack defense only allowed a single touchdown to Boston College running back Andre Williams, but it was the Nevada offense that really shined. Quarterback Colin Kaepernick threw for 192 yards and a touchdown to Rishard Matthews. Matthews provided the most exciting play of the game when he returned a punt 72 yards for a score and a 14-7 lead at the end of the first quarter. Nevada kicker Anthony Martinez and Eagles kicker Nate Freese traded field goals twice in the final three quarters. The Wolf Pack finished with a program-best 13 wins and a No. 11 spot in the final AP Poll. Ault would retire at the end of the 2012 season. Boston College finished with a 7-6 record.

Jan. 10, 1960
East def. West, 34-8
Hula Bowl – Honolulu

In the first all-collegiate Hula Bowl, College Football Hall of Famer and Penn State quarterback Richie Lucas passed for two touchdowns to lead the East All-Stars to a commanding win over the West All-Stars. Lucas earned MVP honors for his efforts. LSU running back Billy Cannon, another Hall of Famer, scored a trio of touchdowns on a punt return, a reception and a run. TCU’s Jack Spikes scored the lone touchdown for the West, and College Football Hall of Fame quarterback Don Meredith (SMU) converted the two-point conversion with a pass to Pacific’s Dick Bass.

Jan. 11, 1975
South ties North 17-17
Senior Bowl – Mobile, Ala.

An MVP performance by College Football Hall of Famer Steve Bartkowski (California) fell short of producing a North victory in the 1975 edition of the Senior Bowl. Bartkowski threw for 227 yards and two second half touchdowns to erase a 14-3 South lead. The South’s two Maryland Terrapins took over in the final minutes with quarterback Bob Avellini leading a 61-yard drive, which was capped by a field goal from kicker Steve Mike-Mayer. The drive included key runs from the College Football Hall of Famer Walter Payton (Jackson State), who led all rushers with 73 yards. The tie marked just the third in Senior Bowl history. The North was coached by College Football Hall of Famer John Ralston, who coached the Denver Broncos at the time.


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About The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame
Founded in 1947 with early leadership from General Douglas MacArthur, legendary Army coach Earl "Red" Blaik and immortal journalist Grantland Rice, The National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame is a non-profit educational organization that runs programs designed to use the power of amateur football in developing scholarship, citizenship and athletic achievement in young people. With 120 chapters and 12,000 members nationwide, NFF programs include the College Football Hall of Fame in Atlanta, the NFF Leadership Hall of Fame, the NFF Scholar-Athlete Awards presented by Fidelity Investments, the NFF High School Showcases, the NFF Hampshire Honor Society, the NFF Faculty Salute Initiative presented by Fidelity Investments, the NFF National Scholar-Athlete Alumni Association, and scholarships of more than $1.3 million for college and high school scholar-athletes. The NFF also collaborates with the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) to release the FWAA-NFF Grantland Rice Super 16 Poll; awards the William V. Campbell Trophy presented by Fidelity Investments and prominently displayed at its official home inside the New York Athletic Club; and bestows several other major awards at the NFF Annual Awards Dinner. NFF corporate partners include the Allstate Sugar Bowl, Fidelity Investments, Herff Jones, the Pasadena Tournament of Roses, the Sports Business Journal and Under Armour. Learn more at www.footballfoundation.org.

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